Tommy's PregnancyHub

5 things to do when you find out you're pregnant

Just found out you’re pregnant? Here are 5 things every mum-to-be should have on her to-do list for a safe and healthy pregnancy.

Congratulations! Whether you’re jumping for joy, still in a state of shock, or feeling a mixture of both - we’re here to support you every step of the way to help you have a healthy pregnancy.

Make sure you’re sitting comfortably, take a deep breath, and let us guide you through the early days. Here are five things to get your pregnancy off to the best start

1. Calculate your due date

Work out your baby's due date with our simple calculator, and sign up to our pregnancy email for free weekly updates on your baby's development.

Calculate your due date

2. Track your baby's development

You can sign up here to get weekly emails from our midwives that track your baby's development in the womb, tell you what to expect next and let you know what you need to do and when. 

3. Contact your GP

This will be the first appointment that kicks off your pregnancy care (antenatal care). Your GP will let the midwifery team know you are pregnant and they will give you a date for your booking appointment, which usually happens around week 8 to 10 of your pregnancy. You may also be able to self-refer or see a midwife straight away, but your GP can let you know how this works in your area.

4. Check how healthy you are

Work out your BMI and check your caffeine intake with our healthy pregnancy tools. Now that you’re pregnant you may need to make some simple lifestyle changes to help your growing baby.

Check how healthy you are with our healthy pregnancy tools.

5. Focus on these for a safer pregnancy

6. Manage your early pregnancy symptoms

The first few weeks of pregnancy can be the toughest when it comes to feeling iffy. Tiredness, sore boobs and morning sickness are all common in the first few weeks of pregnancy. Find out how to cope with them.

There are some symptoms that could be a sign that something is wrong. Be aware of these with our symptom checker and get in touch with a midwife promptly if you have them.

Find out what happens next with our pregnancy calendar.

1. Hollis BW et al. (2011). “Vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy: Double-blind, randomized clinical trial of safety and effectiveness.” JBMR 2011;26:2341-2357

2. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (2008) ‘Antenatal Care’, NICE Clinical Guidelines 62: http://publications.nice.org.uk/antenatal-care-cg62

3. Macdonald S, Magill-Cuerden J (2012) Mayes’ Midwifery, 14th edition, London, Ballière Tindall.

4. NHS Choices [accessed 23/03/2018]  Alcohol in pregnancy http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/pregnancy-and-baby/pages/alcohol-medicines-drugs-pregnant.aspx 

5. ROCG (2015) Alcohol and pregnancy, Information for you, Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists https://www.rcog.org.uk/globalassets/documents/patients/patient-information-leaflets/pregnancy/pi-alcohol-and-pregnancy.pdf 

6. NHS choices [accessed 23/03/2018] Why should I avoid some foods during pregnancy?  http://www.nhs.uk/chq/Pages/917.aspx?CategoryID=54

Review dates
Last reviewed: 10 April 2018
Next review: 10 April 2021