The Lupus in Pregnancy (LIPS) Clinic

The Lupus in Pregnancy (LIPS) Clinic is part of the Tommy's Research Centre at St Mary's Hospital. This specialist antenatal clinic is for pregnant women with Lupus Spectrum disorders and connective tissue disorders.

The LIPS Clinic is a specialist antenatal clinic for pregnant women with Lupus Spectrum disorders including Systemic Lupus Erythematous (SLE), incomplete Lupus Syndrome and the Anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS) as well as other connective tissue disorders. These disorders are linked to serious problems during pregnancy such as pregnancy loss, pre-eclampsia, premature birth and failure of the baby to grow.

The specialist team in the clinic provides pre-conception advice, routine antenatal care such as blood pressure and urine checks, routine antenatal advice, detailed ultrasound scans of the baby and placenta, monitoring of medication, monitoring of blood tests, monitoring and management of symptoms related to the specific disorder such as 'flare ups'. The care plan that is offered is tailored to every woman, depending on her needs.

A research programme embedded in the service aims to collect information about pregnancies in women with Lupus-like disorders and other connective tissue diseases to help us understand pregnancy in women with these disorders better. Collecting information like this helps us to improve outcomes of pregnancy in the future.

All women attending the LIPs clinic are invited to take part in the research study and will be sent the information with the appointment letter. Your decision to help or not with the research project does not make a difference to the clinical care you get.

Referral information

Patients can be referred to the Lupus in Pregnancy (LIPS) Clinic via:

  • their GP
  • community midwife
  • obstetrician
  • reproductive Health Service
  • rheumatology

The clinic helps women with:

  • systematic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE)
  • incomplete Lupus Syndrome
  • anti-phospholipid Syndrome (APS)
  • other connective tissue diseases, including scleroderma, dermatomyositis and others.

Women attending the clinic are offered:

  • preconception care
  • antenatal care
  • management of Lupus in pregnancy including additional pregnancy scans
  • opportunities to be involved in research

Visit our referral information page for more information

Clinic information

The clinic is located at:

5th Floor Tommy's Research Centre

Saint Mary's Hospital

Manchester

Read more

  • Velocity Clinic

    VELOCITY Clinic

    The Manchester VELOCITY Clinic is part of the Tommy's Research Centre at St Mary's Hospital. The clinic provides multidisciplinary care for women who have type 1 or type 2 diabetes.

  • The Manchester Antenatal Vascular Service (MAViS)

    The Manchester Antenatal Vascular Service (MAViS)

    The Manchester Antenatal Vascular Service (MAViS) is part of the Tommy's Research Centre at St Mary's Hospital. The clinic supports women who have a high risk of hypertension in pregnancy, by monitoring women closely, giving them extra scans and specialist support.

  • A header image with the words 'The Rainbow Clinic'

    The Rainbow Clinic

    The Rainbow Clinic is part of the Tommy's Research Centre at St Mary's Hospital in Manchester. It provides specialist care for women who have suffered a previous stillbirth or neonatal death.

  • A header image with the words 'The Placenta Clinic'

    The Placenta Clinic

    The Manchester Placenta Clinic is part of the Tommy's Research Centre at St Mary's Hospital. The clinic aims to improve the care of pregnant women who have, or are at risk of having, babies with fetal growth restriction.

  • researcher looking through microscope

    Tommy’s Manchester Research Centre

    The Tommy’s Maternal and Fetal Health Research Centre at the University of Manchester is made up of internationally renowned clinicians, scientists and researchers investigating stillbirth and associated pregnancy complications.

  • Team of researchers

    Research into stillbirth

    When a baby dies after 24 weeks of gestation, it is called a stillbirth. Nearly 3000 families a year get the devastating news that their baby is not alive. Our research is helping to change this.

    Was this information useful?

    Yes No