How likely is a miscarriage and what can I do to stop it?

Miscarriage is, sadly, fairly common. A quarter of women have experienced a miscarriage in their lifetime.

However, the vast majority of women who miscarry, then go on to have a perfectly healthy pregnancy.

Only 1 percent of women suffer recurrent miscarriages, which is defined as three or more in a row.

This means there is every likelihood that you won’t suffer a miscarriage again, and that your next pregnancy will go well.

There are some things you can do to maximise your chances of a healthy pregnancy.

 

At Tommy's we fund research into the causes and prevention of miscarriage, and we also have miscarriage statistics.

Sources

  1. NICE (2012) Ectopic pregnancy and miscarriage: diagnosis and initial management in early pregnancy of ectopic pregnancy and miscarriage, clinical guideline CG154, National Institute for Health and Care Excellence
  2. Stillbirth (Definition) Act 1992, Definition of stillborn child, Section 1(1), London The Stationery Office, 1992
  3. RCOG (2008) Early miscarriage: information for you, Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, , 2008
  4. RCOG (2008) Bleeding and Pain in early pregnancy: information for you, Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, 2008
  5. RCOG (2012) Recurrent and late miscarriage: tests and treatment of couples, information for you, London Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists
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Last reviewed on August 1st, 2016. Next review date August 1st, 2019.

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