Pregnancy calendar

weeks pregnant

7 weeks pregnant - what to expect

Your little bean is now the size of a grape.

Week 7 infographic.

What does my baby look like? 

Your baby starts to take on slightly alien-like qualities as their head grows faster than the rest of their body. This is to make room for their rapidly developing brain.

Cartilage starts to form in their teeny arm and leg buds. The arms grow longer and flatten out at the ends. This is the beginning of tiny hands.

A delicate network of nerves is spreading through your baby’s body. They are going to start making constant little motions, as their brain and spinal cord sends signals to the muscles in their body. Soon your baby will be able to feel sensations, like temperature and taste.

Actions to take

If you’ve just found out you’re pregnant and have been smoking or drinking alcohol, try not to worry. You can take steps now to look after yourself and your baby by having a healthy lifestyle.

To tell or not to tell

Telling people about your pregnancy is such a personal thing for you and your partner to decide. Many people decide not to go public with their pregnancy until they have their dating scan. Do what’s best for you.

Other than telling work if you think your job poses a risk, many women wait until they’re three months pregnant to tell people. This is because after three months the risk of having a miscarriage goes down.

'I told my parents at six weeks, mainly because if anything had gone wrong at that point I would have wanted their support without having to explain that I was pregnant in the first place. We told everyone else after the 12-week scan.'

Abby, mum of one

If you do have a miscarriage, though, you are likely to need the support of close family and friends, so you could consider telling just a few people before the end of the first three months.

Are you at risk at work?

If you’re worried your job could be a risk to your health, tell your boss you’re pregnant. Your work will need to remove these risks, or perhaps offer you different work.

Things that could cause a risk might include:

  • Heavy lifting or carrying
  • Standing or sitting for long periods without adequate breaks
  • Being exposed to toxic substances
  • Long working hours.

If your employer can't remove any risks, they should suspend you on full pay. You can read more about your rights at work as a pregnant woman on this government website.

Find out more about having a working pregnancy here

Sources

1. http://content.informationserviceforparents.nhs.uk/?KfdMgg6mYR8HPLr9-rpnAISevqcbqwSFK

2. You and your baby at 0–8 weeks pregnant, NHS Choices: http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/pregnancy-and-baby/pages/pregnancy-weeks-4-5-6-7-8.aspx [accessed 28 February 2015] (last reviewed: 9 February 2015; next review due: 9 February 2017).

3. You and your baby at 0–8 weeks pregnant, NHS Choices: http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/pregnancy-and-baby/pages/pregnancy-weeks-4-5-6-7-8.aspx [accessed 28 February 2015] (last reviewed: 9 February 2015; next review due: 9 February 2017).

4. Lennart Nilsson (2009) A Child is Born, Jonathan Cape, p.204

Hide details

Last reviewed on April 1st, 2015. Next review date April 1st, 2018.

Was this information useful?

Yes No