Tommy's PregnancyHub

15 weeks pregnant - all you need to know

Your baby is about the size of a small pear.
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What does my baby look like in week 15?  

Their hearing is developing and from around now they might be able to hear your voice, the comforting sound of your heartbeat and muffled sounds from the outside world.  

They might also start to sense bright light outside your tummy.

Your baby is covered in fine hair, called lanugo. This will usually disappear some time before they are born, unless they arrive early.

This week your baby might start to get hiccups every now and again. Later in your pregnancy, you’ll probably be able to feel little rhythmic flutters when your baby gets them.

Your pregnancy symptoms in week 15

Any morning sickness and tiredness may have lifted by now so this is a good time to become more active. Swimming, pregnancy yoga, walking or just staying on your feet as much as possible during your normal daily activities will all build your strength for the birth and afterwards. Find out more about exercise and activity in pregnancy.

Itchy skin?

Is your skin feeling itchy on your growing bump? This is probably caused by your skin stretching. If so, it’s nothing to worry about. You could try massaging some unscented moisturiser into the skin. You might notice stretch marks.

Severe itching, particularly on hands or feet could be the sign of a serious pregnancy complication called obstetric cholestasis. Find out more about the symptoms of OC/ICP here.

Thrush

You can be more prone to this fungal infection in pregnancy. If you notice any of the symptoms of thrush, have a chat with your midwife about treatment.

Nosebleeds

You might have a stuffy nose or suffer from nosebleeds. Hormonal changes and the increased blood supply in your body can put more pressure on the blood vessels in your nose, causing them to break.

This is pretty common but if your nosebleeds persist, tell your doctor or midwife.

Are you suffering from headaches, cramps, swollen feet or indigestion?

Here’s our guide to 10 common pregnancy complaints (and how to avoid them).

What to do in week 15

Keep moving

Being active during pregnancy will boost your health – and it’s good for your unborn baby, too.  Now that your bump is becoming more obvious you may feel as if you need to protect it more, but it’s safe to exercise right up to your due date as long as you feel okay.

There are a few types of exercise to avoid, such as scuba diving and contact sports, but it’s fine to continue with most of the exercise you did before pregnancy.

If you weren't very active before your pregnancy, it's not too late to start. Walking, swimming and pregnancy yoga or pilates are all good ways to get more active. Start with 10-minute bursts and build up to 30 minutes a day if possible.

“Yoga was fab. It really helped. My labour was amazing and quick and I'm sure it was down to great yoga instruction.” Kelly, mum of one

You don’t have to do a formal exercise class. Climbing the stairs instead of taking the lift or getting off the bus a stop early all counts as exercise.

If you want something more specific, look for antenatal exercise classes at your local leisure centre or ask your midwife about classes for pregnant women in your area.

Taking sick leave during pregnancy

If you need to take time off work for a pregnancy-related illness, it doesn’t count towards your sickness record.

If your manager usually provides sick pay you will still be entitled to this. If your company doesn’t offer sick pay you can apply for statutory sick pay. Find out more about a working pregnancy.

NHS Choices. You and your baby at 13–16 weeks pregnant http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/pregnancy-and-baby/pages/pregnancy-weeks-13-14-15-16.aspx (Page last reviewed: 28/02/2017 Next review due: 28/02/20207)

NICE (2008) Antenatal care for uncomplicated pregnancies,Clinical guideline [CG62] Last updated: January 2017. https://www.nice.org.uk/Guidance/cg62

RCOG (2006) Recreational Exercise and Pregnancy: Information for you, London, Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists: https://www.rcog.org.uk/globalassets/documents/patients/patient-information-leaflets/pregnancy/recreational-exercise-and-pregnancy.pdf

RCOG (2012) Obstetric cholestasis, Information for you. Royal College of Obstetrics and Gynaecologists, London https://www.rcog.org.uk/globalassets/documents/patients/patient-informat...

Review dates

Last reviewed: 25 July, 2018
Next review: 25 July, 2021