Tommy's PregnancyHub

Pregnancy appointments, scans and tests - for dads and partners

Pregnancy (antenatal) appointments are a chance to check that the baby and mum or birthing parent are healthy. They’re also a good time to ask questions and talk about how you’re both coping with the pregnancy. 

Pregnancy (antenatal) appointments are a chance to check that the baby and mum or birthing parent are healthy. They’re also a good time to ask questions and talk about how you’re both coping with the pregnancy. 

Your partner will have regular appointments throughout the pregnancy. These are usually with a midwife but they may sometimes see a doctor who specialises in care during pregnancy, labour and after birth (obstetrician).  

Going to antenatal appointments

Talk to your partner about which appointments and scans you will go to with them. They may sometimes need to see the midwife alone for a few minutes before inviting you in.

The maternity unit’s rules may have changed since the coronavirus pandemic. Ask them for the latest information on who can go to appointments and scans. Your partner can have one person with them for the birth.  

Read more about pregnancy and coronavirus.

Appointments and scans

If this is your partner’s first baby and the pregnancy is straightforward, they will have about 10 appointments and 2 scans. If there are any health problems or worries, they may have more than this. 

At all the appointments, the midwife or doctor will ask you and your partner if you have any questions or worries. They will talk about how your baby is developing and give you information about the pregnancy and birth. 

The appointments and scans timetable

10 weeks – the booking appointment

To check your partner’s health and plan their care. This is usually before 10 weeks. The midwife will check your partner’s blood pressure and urine sample at all future antenatal appointments. Find out more about the booking appointment.

11-14 weeks – ultrasound scan

To confirm your baby’s due date and see if there’s more than one baby.  You and your partner can choose to have a screening test for Down’s syndrome and some other conditions. Find out more about screening and diagnostic tests.

14-18 weeks – antenatal appointment

To talk about the results of any tests done at the booking appointment. If your partner is rhesus negative, they may be offered a test to check the baby’s blood group.  

18-20 weeks – ultrasound scan

This is called the 20-week scan or fetal anomaly scan. To check how your baby is developing.

25 weeks – antenatal appointment

Antenatal appointment – if this is your partner’s first baby. The midwife will check the baby’s growth and movements at the appointments from now on.

28 weeks – antenatal appointment

Includes a blood test to check your partner for anaemia. If they’re rhesus negative, they may have an injection of anti-D treatment. They may have a second injection after the birth.

31 weeks – antenatal appointment

If this is your partner’s first baby. To talk about any test results. To check your baby’s growth.

34 weeks – antenatal appointment

To talk about how to recognise labour and how to get ready for the birth. To check your partner’s health and your baby’s growth. They will have their second anti-D treatment, if needed.

36 weeks – antenatal appointment

To check the position of the baby. If the baby is bottom or feet first in the womb (breech), the midwife or doctor will explain your options.

38 weeks – antenatal appointment

The midwife or doctor will talk to you and your partner about what you would like to do if your baby has not arrived by 41 weeks.

40 weeks – antenatal appointment

If this is your partner’s first baby. To talk again about what might happen if the pregnancy goes past 41 weeks.

41 weeks – antenatal appointment

If your partner has not given birth. To talk about options for inducing labour.

 

 

NICE (2021). Antenatal care. NICE guideline 201. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng201

RCOG (2021) Coronavirus (COVID-19) infection and pregnancy. Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. https://www.rcog.org.uk/en/guidelines-research-services/guidelines/coronavirus-pregnancy/ 

NHS. Your antenatal appointments. https://www.nhs.uk/pregnancy/your-pregnancy-care/your-antenatal-appointments/ (Page last reviewed: 2 September 2019. Next review due: 2 September 202202)

NICE (2016). High-throughput non-invasive prenatal testing for fetal RHD genotype. Diagnostics guidance 25. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/dg25 

Review dates
Reviewed: 16 June 2022 | Next review: 16 June 2025