Instagram superstar speaks out about how high risk pregnancy has affected her mental health

Known for her picture-perfect Instagram account, Jessica Stein has revealed she has been experiencing a high risk pregnancy that’s been far from carefree.

Pregnancy news, 13/02/2017

With over 2 million followers, it’s the endless sunsets and dreamy beach snaps that make Jessica’s Instagram account (@tuulavintage) the ultimate go-to for aspirational travel fans. But the social media star recently revealed that her pregnancy has been far from picture-perfect.

Our little miracle... Seven months of wild waves with this man of my dreams keeping my head above water. I’ve always dreamed of being a mother, but never knew if I could be. I experienced multiple pelvic and internal injuries after being hit by a car at 16 with ongoing pain and limitations, and was warned of what might never come to be. I’ve always wanted to adopt (as my incredible mum was) and my partner and I had been talking about it again just before this unexpected miracle happened. With my personal history and high value of privacy I hope everyone can understand that I would not have shared this online if I didn’t feel the need to talk about the highs and lows that so many experience with challenging pregnancies. I have been struggling with antenatal depression and hope that speaking out might just help heal myself, and someone else too. At our 20 week scan they noticed the lack of amniotic fluid that I had unknowingly been leaking due to my old bladder injury and was diagnosed with PPROM (broken waters). With pre-labour symptoms and anticipating a very, very early arrival I was admitted to hospital in Sydney on bed rest once viable at 24 weeks. I don’t know the words to describe how hopeless I felt… not being able to control my own body, provide for my baby or see hope that we would make it through. Despite my partner being a rock of support and positivity, I have found these last few months to be some of the loneliest of my life. Just days ago we experienced our first true moment of excitement and relief that things will be okay; that we have a little warrior who is beating all of the odds. I have been allowed home for the first time since late last year and the cloud of anxiety is slowly lifting. Thank you to the doctors, midwives and hospitals who have gone above and beyond for us, including all of the women I met while sharing hospital rooms learning about each other’s journeys. We are so grateful to have come this far and be in this position that so many can only dream to reach. We aren’t in the complete clear but know that nothing ever really is. For now we are going to lay low and enjoy every extra week of waiting to meet our miracle...

A photo posted by Jessica Stein (@tuulavintage) on

In a powerful Instagram post Jessica has opened up about the ‘highs and lows that so many experience with challenging pregnancies.’ She writes openly about her struggle with antenatal depression and how having a high risk pregnancy has affected her mental health.

Not only has she candidly described how difficult she's found it being diagnosed with PPROM (Waters breaking early) at 20 weeks: ‘I don’t know the words to describe how hopeless I felt… not being able to control my own body, provide for my baby or see hope that we would make it through.’

But she also speaks about how isolating she has found the experience: ‘Despite my partner being a rock of support and positivity, I have found these last few months to be some of the loneliest of my life.’

We admire Jessica for bravely speaking out about such a personal matter. When a pregnancy is high risk it can be an anxious and difficult time for parents and can feel far from the happy experience you may have hoped for.

Our midwife Sophie explains:

‘With high risk pregnancies there is often a level of uncertainty about the wellbeing of mother, baby or both. This can be stressful and cause anxiety that may make high risk mums more likely to suffer mental health issues in pregnancy like antenatal depression. Pregnancy can be an emotional roller coaster and 1 in 10 women suffer mental health issues in pregnancy. Even if you’re pregnancy isn’t high risk, if you’re feeling worried or low it’s important to talk to your midwife or doctor. They can help you to get the additional support you need and whether it’s more contact appointments with your midwife, or a referral to support services, it might make all the difference in helping you to feel less anxious.’

We admire Jessica for speaking so openly about her high risk pregnancy and experience of antenatal depression. We hope her message will help women going through the same to feel less alone, and encourage mums to seek support with their mental wellbeing when they are feeling low. 

Find out more about waters breaking early (PPROM) here

Find out more about when to get help with your mental wellbeing in pregnancy here.

More on pregnancy

More pregnancy in the news

Was this information useful?

Yes No