Telemetric monitoring of blood sugar levels in pregnant women with diabetes

If we show that telemetry-supported monitoring of blood sugar is feasible within the diabetes antenatal service and is acceptable to women and health professionals, it may have major benefits for the NHS in the delivery of care for these women.

Investigators: Professor Fiona Denison, Professor Rebecca Reynolds, Corinne Love, Brian McKinstry

Summary: Women who already have diabetes or develop diabetes during pregnancy (gestational diabetes) have an increased risk of serious problems during pregnancy. These risks can be reduced by keeping blood sugar levels within a healthy range, which requires intensive monitoring. This involves frequent visits to antenatal or diabetes clinics and review by obstetricians and diabetologists (together or separately). Given the dramatic increase in the number of pregnant women with diabetes, this labour- and time-intensive approach to managing diabetes in pregnancy is not sustainable. In this project we wanted to see whether it is possible to monitor blood sugar control using telemetry.

Progress report: Early feedback from the 32 women and health professionals who took part in the study has been overwhelmingly positive, and we are about to start analysing the data. If we show that telemetry-supported monitoring of blood sugar is feasible within the diabetes antenatal service and is acceptable to women and health professionals, it may have major benefits for the NHS in the delivery of care for these women.

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