Will I miscarry again?

Having a miscarriage is distressing and it’s natural to worry about it happening again. However, if you have miscarried before it doesn’t mean that it will happen again.

If you have miscarried, you are not alone. Having a miscarriage can be distressing and it’s natural to worry about it happening again. Be kind to yourself. It’s understandable if you’re not enjoying trying again and it’s natural to feel some anxiety about how this pregnancy will progress.

If you are struggling with negative feelings, you may need help. Tell your GP and midwife how you feel. They will help you access the support you need.

You can also talk to one of our Tommy’s midwives for free. You can call them on 0800 0147 800, 9am–5pm, Monday–Friday. Or you can email them at [email protected]

Early miscarriage

Early miscarriage happens to about 1 in 5 (20%) women in their lifetime. But most miscarriages are a one-off and there’s a very good chance that your next pregnancy will be successful.

You are not at higher risk of another miscarriage if you have had 1 or 2 early miscarriages.

Late miscarriage

Late miscarriages (a miscarriage that happens after 3 months of pregnancy but before 24 weeks) are less common than early pregnancy. 1–2% pregnancies end in a late miscarriage.

If you have had a late miscarriage, you and your partner should be seen by a specialist health professional. Your doctor should talk to you about your situation and your likelihood of having another miscarriage and successful pregnancy. Most couples who have a late miscarriage are likely to have a successful pregnancy in the future. Find out more about late miscarriages.

Recurrent miscarriages

Recurrent miscarriage is very rare, affecting 1% of couples trying to have a baby. If you have had a recurrent miscarriage, you and your partner should be seen by a specialist health professional. Your doctor should talk to you about your situation and your likelihood of having another miscarriage and successful pregnancy.

Most couples who have recurrent miscarriages are likely to have a successful pregnancy in the future. Find out more about recurrent miscarriage.

“No one can tell you if you are going to have a successful pregnancy or not. You can only trust your gut and if something doesn't feel right, go and get checked out. That way, you know you did what was right for your baby.”

Louise

Molar pregnancy

Having a molar pregnancy doesn't affect your chances of getting pregnant again. The risk of having another molar pregnancy increases, but this risk is still small (about 1%).

It's best not to try for a baby until your after-treatment monitoring has finished.

Find out more about molar pregnancy.

Ectopic pregnancy

If you get pregnant within 2 years of having an ectopic pregnancy, the chances of having another ectopic pregnancy are higher. But the risk is still small (around 10%). Find out more about ectopic pregnancy.

What can I do to reduce the risk of another miscarriage?

Unfortunately, there is nothing you can do that will guarantee that you won’t have a miscarriage. However, we have lots of information about what you can do to stay as healthy as possible before you try for a baby and during pregnancy.

Our midwives can offer you support and information about miscarriage. You can call them for free on 0800 0147 800 (9am–5pm, Monday–Friday) or email them at [email protected].

Find out more about trying again after a miscarriage.

NICE (2019). Ectopic pregnancy and miscarriage: diagnosis and initial management. National Institute for health and care excellence https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng126

Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists (2016) Early miscarriage https://www.rcog.org.uk/globalassets/documents/patients/patient-information-leaflets/pregnancy/pi-early-miscarriage.pdf

Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists (2012) Recurrent and late miscarriage : tests and treatment of couples https://www.rcog.org.uk/globalassets/documents/patients/patient-information-leaflets/pregnancy/pi-recurrent-and-late-miscarriage---tests-and-treatment-of-couples.pdf

NHS Choices. Molar pregnancy. https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/molar-pregnancy/ (Page last reviewed: 20 July 2017. Next review due: 20 July 2020)

NHS Choices. Ectopic pregnancy. https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/ectopic-pregnancy/ (Page last reviewed: 27 November 2018. Next review due: 27 November 2021)

Review dates

Last reviewed: 20 January 2020
Next review: 20 January 2020